Don’t Let the Covid-19 Pandemic Delay Your Move to Senior Living

Don’t Let the Covid-19 Pandemic Delay Your Move to Senior Living

Don’t Let the Covid-19 Pandemic Delay Your Move to Senior Living

With the Covid-19 pandemic continuing to hold a heavy grip on America, now might not seem like the best time to consider a move to senior living. HOWEVER, when you weigh the risks and benefits of moving to a senior living community versus waiting out the pandemic at home, for many individuals, it still makes more sense on balance to start exploring the option of moving.

There are several reasons why joining a senior living community sooner than later might be the best choice for you or an older loved one.

Avoiding Isolation

Older adults who live alone are vulnerable to loneliness and isolation putting them at increased risk of a wide range of physical, emotional, and mental health issues. In fact, according to the National Institute on Aging, research has shown that social isolation and loneliness are linked to higher risks of high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, a weakened immune system, anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s disease, and even death among older adults. Of course, when stay-at-home orders are put in place for weeks or months at a time, older adults’ sense of loneliness is greatly compounded.

In contrast, older adults who choose to live at communities like The Classic, can stay engaged and never have to experience isolation because of the built-in community of residents and staff. A wide variety of activities and amenities are available that can build up and maintain the body, mind, and spirit, all while adhering to all health guidelines and directives.

Strict Health Protocols

Quality senior communities have long since implemented strict protocols in response to the pandemic in order to keep their residents healthy. These measures include: requiring appropriate social distancing, encouraging regular hand washing, limiting or restricting visitations, postponing or modifying group activities, enhancing already strict cleaning and disinfecting protocols, and requiring sick staff members to stay home.

Regular Health Monitoring

Residents at senior living communities like The Classic, are being regularly screened for symptoms of coronavirus so any cases can be caught early to prevent spread to others. Routine health monitoring doesn’t begin or end with Covid-19. Even in “normal” times, nursing and care staff always keep a close eye on the health status of residents, especially those with pre-existing conditions to ensure they’re getting the appropriate treatments and level of care. In addition, medications are kept on hand, so residents don’t have to drive to the pharmacy to get them and staff can assist residents in managing them properly.

Meals and Snacks Provided

One of the biggest challenges facing the general population during the Covid-19 crisis is ensuring that nutritious foods and other essentials are available in sufficient quantities. For many people, that means making regular forays to the grocery store or bulk retail club risking exposure (or exposing others) to the virus on each trip. But for residents of senior living communities, there’s no need to leave home to stock up on food because meals and snacks are always available.

The bottom line is that the Covid-19 pandemic has not stopped many individuals from joining us at The Classic in the past several months and enjoying a healthy, safe, and awesome lifestyle.

Feel free to contact us for a tour and learn more about our most up-to-date policies related to apartment availability, family visits, activities, dining, and much more.

How To Keep Your Senior Loved One’s Morale Upbeat During Covid-19

How To Keep Your Senior Loved One’s Morale Upbeat During Covid-19

How To Keep Your Senior Loved One’s Morale Upbeat During Covid-19

With the Covid-19 pandemic now entering its seventh month, are you having ongoing concerns about the morale of your senior loved one? While The Classic continues to offer patio visits for interaction with families and friends, you may be wondering what are some other methodologies you can explore that will creatively communicate with our residents.

The following information contains some ideas on how you can continue to communicate and show your loved one you are there in spirit and still care.

  • Send snail mail

Handwritten cards and letters are more special than ever, perhaps because electronic communication is increasingly supplanting them. Recipients can display the cards and re-read correspondence to remind themselves that you care.

  • Share a virtual meal

Plan a long-distance date. Order what your loved one likes and pay for it via a meal delivery service and make sure the meal gets there at the appropriate time. Then call to talk during the meal, making sure your loved one knows how to use the speakerphone feature on his/her cellphone or landline phone.

  • Use other delivery services

You know the snacks your loved one likes. Since you can’t bring a few packages of treats during an apartment visit, arrange for a bulk delivery. For those in independent or assisted living who still like to cook, you can get grocery lists and do the shopping for them or use a shopping service. When dropping off your items, be sure to label the boxes or bags in a prominent location and include the resident’s name and room number.

  • Create your own Facebook book club

If your kids are at an age where they love being read to, make sure Grandma or Grandpa has some kids’ books they can read aloud. If they don’t, order some online, using the video-calling feature on their digital device. Among the most popular video calling apps are Apple’s Facetime. Please note, this app only works with iPhones, iPads, and Macintosh computers. Other options include: Skype, Amazon Alexa, Facebook Messenger, Google Duo, and IMO. Viber and WhatsApp also work on Google Android, Microsoft Windows and other devices.

Be sure to coordinate so that everyone is on the same platform. This way, grandkids of different siblings can be on the same story time call.

Older kids can make the call more like adults’ book clubs. Both the grandparent and grandchild can read a couple of chapters of the same book and talk about their impressions or what they learned.

Watching the same TV shows together, such as a documentary on Netflix or Amazon Prime, can also spark discussions that spans generations.

And if reading a book or watching a documentary isn’t an option, perhaps because of your loved one’s memory loss, help the kids in a sing-along. Singing old, familiar songs, “Happy Birthday,” or classic hymns of they’re religious, can bring back memories and is a skill that often remains even if speech is difficult.

  • Order a jigsaw puzzle of your family

Mail order companies specialize in custom puzzles from photographs or perhaps your child’s artwork. If your loved one is a puzzle lover, you can have a puzzle delivered that contains 2,000 or more pieces. But also available are those with as few as 15 pieces, which might work well for people with dementia or less dexterity. While you’re at it, order a coffee mug with a favorite family photo on it.

  • Play a board game

Think about the games your family loved growing up, such as Clue, Monopoly, Life, Scrabble, or Sorry, or if you have young kids, children’s classics such as Candyland or Chutes & Ladders. Familiarity with the rules is important.

Backgammon, bingo, and chess also will work if you’ve played those in the past and both sides know the lingo of the game. Make sure identical game boards are set up at your house and your loved one’s home You and your family then can play the game over the telephone, talking about how the dice landed and what moves your game piece is making. A cellphone set on speaker will work well for this because games sometimes take hours. A video call also will add dimension but isn’t necessary if everyone commits to narrating their actions.

  • Assemble a hobby box

Since The Classic has suspended many of the group activities, your loved ones have a lot more free time on their hands.

This is the time to find a nice box at a craft store, perhaps decorate it and fill it with items that your loved one can come back to again and again. Put in items that will work with their existing hobbies or ask what they’ve always wanted to try. Think crossword puzzle books for those who like a brain challenge, paints, and suitable paper for those who have been artistic in the craft room, squishy balls and miniature Slinkys for other toys for those with a silly streak, yarn and hooks for crocheters.

Why Senior Living is an Excellent Option for Senior’s Safety and Happiness

Why Senior Living is an Excellent Option for Senior’s Safety and Happiness

Why Senior Living is an Excellent Option for Senior’s Safety and Happiness

Today’s senior living communities are very different from those of the past and they should not be confused with nursing homes. They typically are independent living, age-restricted residences for those who want to downsize and live a more maintenance–free lifestyle and may also offer additional assisted living services if needed. Many times, older adults move to these communities when their spouses pass away, when they are recently retired, when their family home seems too large to manage, or are simply planning for a new chapter in their life.

Consider the following benefits to understand how a move to senior living could help you happy and healthy as you age.

Senior Social Interaction

Loneliness can lead to depression, high blood pressure, and early mortality in seniors according to research from the University of Chicago. Even if an elderly person is in good health, aging alone by one’s self can be emotionally detrimental. During the coronavirus pandemic, planned interaction is more important than ever. Seniors aging at home can be having very limited access to family and friends or be unable to visit local senior centers, which can lead to increased isolation. Independent and assisted living communities like The Classic at Hillcrest Greens have worked very hard to adapt to social distancing while creating new activities for seniors to stay engaged and safe. Happy hours, communal art classes, and other large-group activities are on hold, but the happiness of elderly residents is still a top priority.

Intellectual Stimulation

Assisted and independent living communities offer opportunities for lifetime learning. Even as communities practice social distancing, many residents can have access to having books delivered and can always subscribe to online courses. Other options include “brain training” resources and brain games for seniors that my lower the risk of long-term cognitive decline.

Senior Safety

Keeping seniors healthy and safe is a priority for independent and assisted living communities.

Senior living minimizes the risks of falls

Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries in seniors 65 and older, according to the CDC. Independent and assisted living communities are designed for accessibility and mobility, with ramps, flat thresholds, and hallway hand railings. Raised toilets, specially designed walk-in showers and grab bars in bathrooms also reduce the risk of falls.

Security is always available

Elderly people are often targets for break-ins and scams. Senior living communities have security measures and alarm systems in place to provide peace of mind.

Senior living communities are prepared for disaster

Elderly people aging in their own home are responsible for checking smoke detectors, installing carbon monoxide alarms, and replacing fire extinguishers. In the event of an emergency like a tornado, earthquake, or fire they might have to find safety on their own. Assisted and independent living communities have disaster plans and staff are prepared to help seniors in case of an emergency.

On-call staff provide peace of mind in medical emergencies

Rooms in independent and assisted living communities have medical alert systems in place to notify staff in case of a fall or injury. This means seniors don’t have to worry about struggling to contact help or waiting to be found after a medical emergency.

Fitness and Physical Activities for Seniors

Seniors who are physically active tend to live longer. Exercise classes offer the opportunity for physical fitness. Even as communities practice social distancing, activities directors have come up with ways to keep seniors active, like hallway exercise classes, and in-room chair yoga.

Chef-prepared, nutritious meals

Seniors living alone may find it difficult to adjust to cooking for one, and it may be challenging for family caregivers to ensure their loved one is getting adequate nutrition. In assisted living, residents are served up to three meals a day, with attention to special dietary needs for people with diabetes and food allergies.

Maintenance-free lifestyle

Home maintenance can be both physically difficult and emotionally stressful. A water leak, broken ramp, or downed tree can make a senior’s home inaccessible. Outsourcing lawn care, snow removal, and minor house repairs can also be expensive. If your loved one enjoys yard work or tinkering, look for a community that allows them to pursue that passion.

Help with activities of daily living

Almost 80% of help with activities of daily living (ADLs) www.theclassichg.com/assessing-your-loved-ones-ability-to-complete-activities-of-daily-living/ comes from unpaid family caregivers, according to an AARP study of caregiving in the U.S. Minor assistance with dressing, bathing, and daily grooming provided by senior living can help keep aging adults feeling independent longer. Plus, less reliance on friends and family members for daily help leads to more fun, quality time with loved ones.

No more boredom

After retirement, seniors may be overwhelmed by free time. These extra hours can be used to pursue passions or pick up new hobbies. Many independent and assisted living communities offer activities that appeal to all walks of life. Art classes, cooking lessons, and community service projects are all ways to kindle new interests, while lending libraries and movie nights provide classic entertainment all in one place.

Stress-free lifestyle

Rent at independent and assisted living communities is generally all-inclusive. That means seniors don’t have to worry about housekeeping, laundry, or chores. Transportation is also available, so there’s no stress about finding rides to appointments if there isn’t health care on-site. Twenty-four-hour on-call staff members provide peace of mind in case of medical emergencies like falls or maintenance emergencies like plumbing leaks. Currently, senior living communities are focusing on minimizing coronavirus-related stress in seniors as well. www.theclassichg.com/moving-to-the-classic-during-covid-19/.

Learn more abut independent or assisted living

If your aging loved one would enjoy the lifestyle benefits of independent or assisted living, feel free to reach out to The Classic at Hillcrest Greens at www.theclassichg.com/contact-us/.

Moving to The Classic During Covid-19

Moving to The Classic During Covid-19

Moving to The Classic During Covid-19

Life during a global pandemic isn’t easy. Many of the things we used to do have been canceled or modified. We’re learning, adapting, and growing as we carry on in the safest, healthiest ways we can. Ideally, we’re becoming stronger as individuals, communities, and businesses because of what we’re going through.

Despite the pandemic, life still goes on. We all age, and our wants and needs change as we do. Even with everything going on, locally, nationally, and in the world, The Classic continues to thrive. Our senior living community remains a fantastic option for older adults looking for a carefree life or receive a bit of additional care if needed. Our missions continues in caring for older adults and providing an unmatched senior living experience to meet our resident’s physical, social, and spiritual needs through high-quality housing and services.

While the Covid-19 pandemic has changed procedures and daily activities, we are as prepared as ever to implement and carry out safe practices to keep our residents safe, while still offering the highest quality senior living experience.

If you or a loved one have considered moving to a senior community in the near future, the Covid-19 pandemic does not mean you need to change or delay those plans. While things may look a bit different, we’re still here for you.

Coronavirus doesn’t change the fact that about 10,000 Americans are turning age 65 every day and by 2030, all baby boomers will be 65 or older.

Regardless of where you are in your journey, from touring all the way to making a move, we’re ready to help during each step to make sure you’re comfortable in your new life.

You may still connect with us and come for a tour

This is the best way to get all your questions answered! Whether you prefer a phone call, email, video call, or an in-person visit to speak with us, we are happy to get you the introductory information you need and arrange for a tour.

What’s different?

If you arrange for an onsite tour, as with all interactions on our campus during this time, anyone on site is required to wear a face mask, main social distancing of at least six feet, and practice regular, vigilant hand hygiene by washing with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizer. We ask that no more than three additional persons come with you for the tour to keep group sizes small.

Yes…you may still join our wait list.

While we currently have immediate openings and can move in right now, joining our wait list is still a wise decision for your future. Our practices in this regard remain the same as always when a desired unit become available, we contact interested individuals based on the order in which they joined our wait list. You may say, “I’m not ready yet” as often as you need, and we’ll be sure to call you in the same order the next time.

Whenever possible, we encourage you to work with our Community Relations Director well in advance of being ready to move or needing the care, so the control is in your hands. It’s never ideal to find yourself in a pinch, needing to move quickly without having made prior arrangements. Do your homework ahead of time. Perhaps you even have some extra time on your hands as you stay home during the pandemic. Get a head start by checking out the information on our website and contact us to get started.

What’s different?

Nothing really. Our wait list procedure remains the same as always.

Yes…you may still move in.

That’s right. Older adults still want and need senior living communities and we’re still ready to provide that, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. After you’ve gotten your questions answered, decided on the level of care and unit that’s right for you, joined our waiting list, and selected your new home, we’ll work together on a move-in plan that’s right for you while adhering to all guidelines to keep you healthy.

What’s different?

During the move, use of a professional moving company is recommended but isn’t mandatory. We ask that you coordinate a move-in date and time with us that will allow the moving company or yourself/family members/friends to bring your furniture and personal items to our facility. Our staff will be responsible for physically moving your items from the truck and/or trailer to your apartment. Additionally, we can allow one or two trusted loved ones to come onsite during your move-in day to help with your move and help unpack. As with any other visitors and all our staff members, those helping you with your move will need to check in at our Concierge desk to have his/her temperature taken, and attest that they have no coronavirus symptoms.

Upon moving in, you will be asked to self-quarantine by staying in your apartment for 14 days before mixing and mingling with our other residents. Don’t worry, any services included in your new home will still come to your door, like meals, activities, mail, and more. Once the 14-day quarantine period is over, you are welcome to move about the entire community as long as you are masked.

Yes…you may still enjoy leisurely living with the care you need.

At The Classic, our community is stronger than ever, taking seriously our responsibility to keep ourselves and our residents and staff members healthy.

Since the onset of the pandemic, Classic residents at all levels continue to enjoy daily recreational programming, personalized care, nourishing meals, and comfortable living spaces and common areas.

What’s different?

While we are not gathering in large groups to engage in special events, activities, meals, or outings, we’ve carefully implemented well-planned, socially distanced activities along with specially delivered treats and hallway fun. Visit our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/TheClassicHillcrestGreens/ for an up-to-date feed of all our current happenings that are still going on safely during Covid-19. As we carefully plan for the gradual reintroduction of limited events, updates will be shared on social media and our website, so feel free to check often.

Residents and staff continue to main social distancing and wear masks when outside their apartment. In addition, we’ve long since implemented enhanced cleaning and sanitizing procedures to maintain the utmost cleanliness and health for all.

Yes…you may still engage socially in a safe way.

Social interaction is an important component of holistic wellness, and we fully support engagement with loved ones and peers.

What’s Different?

All residents and staff at The Classic must wear a mask when in common areas, and we continue daily conversations and check-ins to help keep connections strong. In certain situations, group gatherings are permitted, but limited to no more than 10 individuals at a time, and these gatherings take place in locations that may accommodate proper distancing of six feet or more.

Visitors to our community may drop off groceries or other essentials in our main entrance entryway. Virtual video calls or scheduled “patio visits” can be scheduled by calling our Concierge desk between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. At this time, in-person visits are limited to circumstances relating to end-of-life.

We know these times are unprecedented and difficult and there’s a lot of uncertainty. At The Classic, we strive to make the most out of every day, while maintaining our commitment to the safety of our residents and staff.

Feel free to contact us for our most up-to-date policies related to visits, activities, dining, and more as things can change frequently during the pandemic.

It’s still possible to live a healthy, safe, and awesome lifestyle at a senior living community like The Classic. We look forward to helping you do just that as you begin your next adventure.

Worried About a Move to Senior Living? Don’t Be!

Worried About a Move to Senior Living? Don’t Be!

Worried About a Move to Senior Living? Don’t Be!

The vast majority of our society’s fears about senior living communities are inaccurate. Over the past decade, baby boomers have reinvented what senior living really means. Today there are a wide range of state-of-the-art senior living communities, from totally independent living to assisted living for those who need day-to-day help.

These options all aim to provide seniors with a lifestyle tailored to their individual interests and needs, while also offering the necessary care to remain mentally, physically, and socially healthy.

If you, a parent, or a senior loved are worried about making a move to senior living, the following information may help allay some of those fears.

  1. “I’ll be bored.”

With the activities and amenities offered by today’s senior living communities, there’s no time to be bored. Senior housing has evolved to offer everything from field trips and outdoor excursions to fitness and personal enrichment classes.

  1. “I’ll drain my finances.”

Yes, senior living can seem financially daunting, but if you’re already thinking about how to afford the care, you’re ahead of the curve. With some financial planning and maybe a little help from Social Security or VA benefits senior living communities just might cost less than staying at home.

  1. “I’m afraid I won’t receive the best care for me.”

There’s far more to senior living than the stereotype of adult children dropping off their parents with random strangers. When it’s time to move to senior living, the process of decision-making is one that should involve the entire family and your senior loved one should be just as comfortable with their new home as you are moving them there. Caregivers should maintain regular contact with senior loved ones, particularly in the weeks after the first move.

  1. “I will get old and sick faster.”

Whether you’re old or young, it’s being alone or isolated that leads to anxiety and depression, while the social contact a senior living community provides is key to better health and quality of life. If a senior loved one is already ill, with Alzheimer’s disease for example, memory care offers daily stimulation, customized care and planned activities, all of which can actually slow down the progress of an illness or even improve behavior and health.

  1. “I will lose my independence.”

While some seniors fear that senior living is equal to a loss of independence, the truth is in fact much the opposite. If you choose assisted living, you’ll have help with cleaning, cooking, and other chores that only become more difficult over time. What senior living offers is greater freedom with the precious time you do have. To make that time happy and rewarding, communities provide ample opportunity for social activities on-site as well as transportation around the area when you need it.

  1. “I won’t be able to control my daily activities or life.”

Moving to a new residence and letting go of long-held habits of daily life these are often realities of getting older, but they can be difficult and require a major adjustment. Take your loved one’s concerns seriously and don’t minimize their feelings. The fact is, assisted living can be a necessary and freeing step for both seniors and their families. If it is already too difficult for a senior to care for herself independently, or for caregivers to provide the necessary help, then assisted living may be a good option. The emphasis is on safety and security, but also independence and privacy, enabling each resident to have the care they need without compromising individual dignity.

  1. “People will forget about me.”

It’s natural to worry about being alone, especially if you define yourself by those relationships you value. However, moving into senior living doesn’t mean you’ll lose those relationships. In fact, you just might value them even more. At the same time, a senior community provides new venues for social contact, not to mention onsite help when there’s an emergency.